Sample Law School Application Essay - After

Picking up where I left off ( for writing your law school essays), and continuing with the larger theme of learning how to decode your application instructions:

Let me conclude by saying that law school essays are difficult to crack!

In a Law school essay, when you write on a theme like ‘Why I Want to be a Lawyer’, you could be a little creative and describe an incident in which you saw injustice take place. You could follow this by describing how you decided to help in serving justice. Always remember that admissions officers need to see something different, appealing and intelligent from applicants who are potential lawyers. This will make it easier for them to consider your Law school essay. A good selection of words can help an admission officer remember your essay out of a whole stack.


Law School Application Essays/Personal Statements

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY EXAMPLE LAW SCHOOL ESSAY WRITING TUTORIAL IS RELATED ,

The second most important thing you need to know when approaching your required law school application essays is that you need to pay attention to the essay question and make sure you are answering that question—not that other school’s question, and not the question you wish were being asked. (Unless, of course, a school invites you to ask and answer your own question, as Georgetown was recently doing in an optional essay.)


Think your law school personal statement is something you can crank out at the last minute? Think again. Today more than ever, law schools put enormous emphasis on law school essays when deciding which applicants will be accepted and which will be rejected. It takes an extremely strong, personal, and compelling law school essay to set yourself apart from the crowd of other competitive applicants and give yourself a leg up in today’s cutthroat application process. Otherwise, you’re likely to fade into the crowd. “There is a system for handling the law school essay exam well. It's the single most important key to law school success. Its creator is Wentworth Miller, founder of LEEWS. A friend who made law review discovered that every one of his fellow editors had taken LEEWS in their first semester of law school, as had he. Other than this book, LEEWS is the best thing you could possibly have going for you.”
— PLANET LAW SCHOOL (1998), pp. 83, 89.*